Samuel Goldberg has been a Massachusetts criminal defense attorney for 20 years. Prior to that, he was a New York state prosecutor. He has published various articles regarding the practice of criminal law and frequently provides legal analysis on radio and television, appearing on outlets such as the Fox News Channel, Court TV, MSNBC and The BBC Network. To speak to Sam about a criminal matter call (617) 492 3000.

Is Pointing a Gun at Someone a Crime?

In short, yes. But it’s not only the gun that matters, it’s the threat. If you threaten a person with physical harm, and the person reasonably believes that you may inflict that harm, that crime is known as “assault.” Whether you point a gun, a knife, or even a closed fist at someone, if he or she fears for their safety, you may be charged with assault. That being said, pointing a gun at someone is more likely to be perceived as a real threat than shaking a closed fist would be. For this reason, an assault charge involving a gun will probably require a more complex defense than would an assault without a deadly weapon. An experienced Boston criminal defense attorney can help you determine how to proceed if you are charged with assault.

The sheer presence of a firearm is compelling evidence for the prosecution. Consider the following example: About one year ago, a Maryland police officer was convicted of first and second degree assault after he was caught on film ordering a man into his vehicle while pointing a gun at his head. Officer Jenchesky Santiago was observed shouting at William Cunningham in a way that seemed to convince both Cunningham and those who watched the video that he intended to use the gun. And the whole incident began because Cunningham was illegally parked. Not only was the officer’s response disproportionate to the very minor infraction, it was deemed an assault crime in court.

Assault vs. Assault and Battery

Assault can be a confusing charge because it is often used interchangeably with assault and battery. But battery is really a separate activity. While assault occurs when you make a threat of physical harm, battery occurs when you make good on that threat. The individual doesn’t have to be injured by the battery to constitute a charge of assault and battery. For example, if you attempt to punch someone in the face but he ducks and you only graze his cheek, you can still be charged with assault and battery. In that example, you may even be charged with assault and battery if you miss him entirely. The simple fact that you attempted to make good on your threat of physical harm is often enough.

Penalties for Assault or Assault and Battery

Not every threat is assault, however. A skilled MA defense attorney can help you protect your rights and reputation if you are facing an assault charge. If you are convicted of assault, or assault and battery, you may face the following penalties:

  • Both assault and assault and battery are punishable by a fine of up to $1,000 and up to two-and-a-half years in jail.
  • Assault that causes serious bodily injury is punishable by a fine of up to $5,000 and up to five years in prison.
  • If you cause harm to a child, you can face up to five years in prison. If that harm is substantial, you may spend up to 15 years in prison.

Altman & Altman, LLP – Assault and Battery Defense Attorneys Serving Boston and the Surrounding Areas

If you have been charged with any type of crime, the skilled defense team at Altman & Altman, LLP can help. We have been protecting the rights of individuals charged with crimes for more than 50 years. People make mistakes. Don’t make another one by hiring the wrong attorney. An experienced defense attorney will know how to position you for the most favorable outcome. We will find the weaknesses in the prosecution’s case and work tirelessly to keep your record clean. If you are facing criminal charges, we can help. Contact Altman & Altman, LLP today for a free and confidential consultation about your case.

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